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CORE Hunter Education Animal Identification Quiz CORE Exam Challenge

CORE Hunter Education Animal Identification Quiz CORE Exam Challenge

Ungulets

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The ungulates of B.C. are split-hoofed animals with an even number of toes. The ungulates are also all ruminants, meaning they are animals that have four-chambered stomachs.

Bovids

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Bovids have horns Bovids include: Bighorn and Thinhorn Sheep, Mountain Goats, and Bison.

Cervids

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Cervids have antlers Cervids include Deer, Caribou, Elk, and Moose.

Carnivore

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Carnivore meat-eating animal.

Omnivore

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Omnivore animal that eats both meat and plant material.

Herbivore

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Herbivore plant-eating animal.

Bighorn Sheep

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Massive curling horns that spiral tight to the head. You can determine age of animal by the annuli: darkened rings which indicate periods of slower growth. Brown coat with white belly and white rump (backside). Found on rocky, mountainous terrain. Southern ½ of province.

Thinhorn Sheep

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Horns are “thinner” and spiral farther away from the face than Bighorns. Thinhorns generally smaller than Bighorns. Located in the remote northern part of the province in very rugged terrain.

Mountain Goat

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The mountain goat is not a goat, it’s actually a mountain-dwelling antelope. They are all white all year round with shaggy hair, black hooves and horns. Both billies (males) and nannies (females) have horns. Females have a wider gap between horns than males and have more curve in the horns.

Bison

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Largest ungulate in B.C. – can get up to 2,000 lbs in weight. Bull’s and cow’s are similar in appearance, but bulls are twice the size of the cows (sexual dimorphism). Short black horns, head and front quarters covered in shaggy dark hair. Located in northern B.C.

Moose

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Large ungulate (second largest North America) with massive, palmate antlers. Dark brown/black body with greyish legs. Solitary animal that can be found in swampy areas. Has a flap of skin that hangs down from the moose’s neck called a bell or dewlap. Acts as a scent gland during the rut.

Elk

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Larger than deer and caribou. Reddish-brown coat with large cream-coloured rump. Antlers are on a long backward sweeping main beam with unbranched upward sweeping tines that form an “E”. Holds its head high as it moves (regal appearance). Usually found in herds in semi-open forested areas.

Caribou

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Very dark brown body with white neck, belly and rump. Antler makes a “C” shape. Large hoofs act as snowshoes to walk on soft snow or muskeg. Found primarily in the North, prefers mountainous areas.

Mule Deer

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Largest of the 3 native deer species. Antlers grow in forked pairs, white rump with black-tipped tail, and large ears. Not easily startled, may look back when running for cover. Run with high stiff-legged bounce.

White-tailed Deer

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Mid-sized of the 3 native deer. Antlers grow on a mainbeam with unbranched tines sweeping upward. White muzzle, neck patch and underside of body. Flags it’s tail high when running in undulating leaps (prancing). More skittish than Mule deer.

Black-tailed Deer

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Smallest of the 3 native deer species. Antlers grow in forked pairs, almost no rump with wide diamond shaped black tail. When startled, they’ll run with high stiff-legged bounce similar to Mule. Found in forests and forest edges.

Fallow Deer

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Non native deer species introduced from the Mediterranean. Large antlers that starts off narrow and becomes palmate with backward sweeping tines. Light brown coat with white spots. Mainly found on Sidney and James Islands off of Vancouver Island. Widely farmed.

Cougar

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Largest cat in B.C. Extremely elusive. Long slender body with long, cylindrical tail used for balancing. Prominent whiskers and short round ears. Found in mountainous forests. Usually attack from behind. Main prey is deer.

Lynx

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Mid-sized member of the cat family. Solid grey in winter turning to brown during the summer months. Long legs and massive paws for distributing weight in deep snow. Distinctive long, black ear tuffs. Prefers mixed deciduous/coniferous forests.

Bobcat

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Smaller than the Lynx. More house cat like. Short tail black tipped tail. Ear tuffs are not as noticeable as in the Lynx. Prefer semi-open, brushy forests.

Wolf

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Largest of the dog-like carnivores. Distinctive vocalizations (howling). Variable coat colour, usually gray. Can be all white or black. Long legs, big paws. Holds its tail high when running. Hunts in groups of 3 or more (pack hunter). Found all throughout B.C. except for the Queen Charlotte Islands.

Coyote

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Mid-sized member of the dog family. Usually a grayish brown coat. Bushy tail that is usually carried low unlike a wolf. Face is more pointed and narrower than a wolf. Not found on Vancouver or coastal Islands.

Red Fox

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Non game animal. There is no hunting season for Fox. Smallest of the dog family with reddish coat, white chest and belly. White-tipped tail. Variable habitat, though found on edges of fields, forests, farmland.

Grizzly Bear

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Largest of the two bear species. Usually blonde or brownish coat with silver-tipped hairs. Pronounced shoulder hump, dish-shaped face, and short round ears. Long claws. Prefer mountainous wilderness habitat. Found all throughout B.C. except coastal islands.

Black Bear

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Smaller than grizzlies. Usually black in colour, but can have blonde and cinnamon bears. Straight pointed face, short curved claws, and no shoulder hump. Located all throughout B.C.

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