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The Canadian Firearms Safety Course 3 common shotgun shell lengths?

The Canadian Firearms Safety Course 3 common shotgun shell lengths?

The Canadian Firearms Safety Course 3 common shotgun shell lengths?

The Canadian Firearms Safety Course 3 common shotgun shell lengths? The common lengths are 2-3/4 inches, 3 inches, and 3-1/2 inches.  Not all lengths will feed in all shotguns. The common lengths are 2-3/4 inches, 3 inches, and 3-1/2 inches. The longer the shell, the more shot pellets and powder it can contain.

A shotgun shell, or shotshell, is a self-contained cartridge typically loaded with multiple metallic “shots”, which are small, generally spherical projectiles. Traditionally lead was used, but increasingly steel, tungsten or bismuth shot has replaced lead, due to laws designed to protect the environment. A single, large projectile known as a shotgun slug can also be used, and numerous specialty rounds such as less-lethal rounds(e.g. beanbag rounds), flechette rounds, lead-dust rounds for door-breaching are also available. An old non-lethal shotgun load consisted of a shotgun shell loaded with rock salt, which could inflict very painful (but rarely deadly) wounds, and was therefore popular for scaring away trespassers.

Most shotgun shells are designed to be fired from a smoothbore barrel, but dedicated shotguns with rifled barrels are limited to sabot slugs. A rifled barrel will increase the accuracy of sabot slugs, but makes it unsuitable for firing shots, as it imparts a spin to the shot cup, causing a centrifugal force that makes the shot cluster disperse. A rifled slug uses rifling on the slug itself so it can be used in a smoothbore shotgun. Specialty shotgun ammunition includes non-lethal rounds available in the form of slugs made of low-density material, such as rubber.

Early shotgun shells used brass cases, not unlike rifle and pistol cartridge cases of the same era. These brass shotgun hulls or cases closely resembled rifle cartridges, in terms of both the head and primer portions of the shotgun shell, as well as in their dimensions. Card wads, made of felt, leather, and cork, as well as paperboard, were all used at various times

 

 

Eric Beer | BC Firearm Academy

3229 Fraser St, Vancouver, BC V5V 4B8

604-592-2410

http://bcfirearmsacademy.ca

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