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Shooting Disciplines What is Trapshooting?

Shooting Disciplines What is Trapshooting?

Shooting Disciplines What is Trapshooting?

Trap shooting, or trapshooting in North America, is one of the three major disciplines of competitive clay pigeon shooting, which is shooting shotguns at clay targets. The other disciplines are skeet shooting and sporting clays.

They are distinguished roughly as follows, with variations within each group. In trap shooting, the targets are launched from a single “house” or machine, generally away from the shooter. In skeet shooting, targets are launched from two houses in somewhat sideways paths that intersect in front of the shooter. Sporting clays includes a more complex course, with many launch points.Free Shotgun Gun photo and picture

Trap shooting was originally developed, in part, to augment bird hunting and to provide a method of practice for bird hunters. Use of targets was introduced as a replacement for live pigeon-shooting. Indeed, one of the names for the targets used in shooting games is clay pigeons. The layout of a modern trap shooting field differs from that of a skeet field and/or a sporting clays course.

Trap shooting has been a sport since the late 18th century when real birds were used; usually the passenger pigeon, which was extremely abundant at the time. Birds were placed under hats or in traps which were then released. Artificial birds were introduced around the time of the American Civil War. Glass balls (Bogardus) and subsequently “clay” targets were introduced in the later 1800s, gaining wide acceptance.

Trap shooting is practiced all over the world but is most popular in the United States (particularly the Midwest), Canada and Europe. Trap shooting variants include, but are not limited to, international varieties Olympic trap, also known as “International Trap”, “Bunker”, ISSF Trap, “Trench”. Non-Olympic shooting variants include Down-The-Line, also known as “DTL”, Nordic Trap, and double trap. American Trap is the predominant version in the United States and Canada.

American Trap has two independent governing bodies. The Amateur Trapshooting Association (ATA)[6] sanctions events throughout the United States and Canada, as well as the Pacific International Trapshooting Association (PITA) which sanctions events on the West Coast of North America.Free Shooting Shotgun photo and picture

Trap shooting is typically shot with a 12 gauge shotgun. Smaller gauge firearms (e.g. 16, 20, 24, 28, 32 gauge and .410 bore) can be used, but no allowance is given. Trap shooting is shot at either single or double target presentations. This refers to the number of clay targets which are launched simultaneously.

Both general purpose shotguns and more specialized target-type shotguns are used in trap shooting, and may be double-barreled or single-barreled. Shooters who shoot all sub-events will often buy a combination-set of a single and double barrel for shooting both singles and double targets respectively. Semi-automatic shotguns are also popular for recreational shooting due to the lower perceived recoil and versatility because they can be used for singles, handicap, and doubles. Shotguns used in trap shooting can differ from field and skeet guns in several ways and normally are designed with a higher “point of impact” as the targets are intended to be shot as they rise.

Trap shooting shotguns can be adjustable. Stocks may have a “Monte Carlo” (fixed, raised “comb”) configuration and/or include a comb height adjustment, a butt plate adjustment for length, angle, or both. Trap guns typically have longer barrels of 762–863.6 mm (30.00–34.00 in), possibly with porting and featuring tighter chokes to compensate for the longer distances at which trap shooting targets are broken. The majority of trap shotguns built today feature interchangeable choke tubes as opposed to older guns, which used chokes of a “fixed” constriction. Interchangeable choke tubes can come in a variety of constrictions and may use names such as “modified”, “improved cylinder”, and “full”. Trap guns are built to withstand the demands and stress of constant and lengthy repeated use—hundreds of shots in a single day of events, whereas typical field guns are built to be lighter, carried afield, and not shot in such quantity.Free Cartridge Cases Ammunition photo and picture

Common accessories include wearing a vest or pouch that will hold at least 25–50 cartridges or “shells” for singles and/or doubles events. Most ranges and clubs require eye and ear protection due to the extremely loud environment and possible danger of using firearms.

Shooting glasses may be something as simple as the eyeglasses or sunglasses one presently wears. However, this is generally considered unsafe as standard eyeglasses and sunglasses are often not shatter proof. Specialized shooting glasses typically have interchangeable colored lenses, are adjustable, and are designed for high-impact resistance. A spectrum of different colored lenses are offered to compensate for light conditions as well as enhance the color of the target thrown while muting the color of the background. Adjustable glasses allow on-range changes for conditions of light, color, etc.

Hearing protection also comes in a variety of styles. Dense foam and electronics are used to reduce sound levels. Typical hearing protection is either an “earmuff” (worn over the ear) or an “ear plug” (worn in the ear canal). Some shooters use both simultaneously to gain greater noise reduction (NRR). There are also “ear plugs” molded to the shape of the ear, which can be used for listening to music while shooting.a person holding a rifle in their hand

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