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Shooting Disciplines What is Multigun?

Shooting Disciplines What is Multigun?

Shooting Disciplines What is Multigun?

Often called 2-Gun or 3 Gun; Rifles, Shotgun, Handgun. Practical shooting events where each of the stages generally requires the competitor to use and transition between a combination of rifles, handguns, and/ or shotguns.

  • Multigun are practical shooting events where each of the stages generally require the competitor to use and transition between a combination of rifles, handguns, and/ or shotguns[29] or other types of firearms. 3-Gun has a lot in common with ordinary IPSC/USPSA matches, having courses of fire where the shooter must move through different stages and engage targets in a variety of different positions.

C.T. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shooting_sports#Para_shooting

Dynamic Shooting Sports (British Columbia) Association 

About DSSBCA

The Dynamic Shooting Sports (British Columbia) Association is a Society founded in 2015 with the following purpose:

“The Association exists to promote safe and responsible participation in dynamic shooting sports.”

The first two Clubs to affiliate with DSSBCA have been Thompson Mountain Sportsman Association and Chilliwack Fish and Game Protective Association. We are actively working with several other clubs in BC to further facilitate the growth of action shooting sports.

DSSBCA was registered as a formal Society to facilitate expanding dynamic shooting sports. As a Society DSSBCA may acquire insurance, a bank account, and own property. It is hoped that the Society will allow interested Clubs to pool their resources and purchase equipment and props to facilitate hosting matches. It also provides the framework for additional Clubs to raise or formalize their own dynamic shooting sections.

DSSBCA created the CASE qualifier program to assess participants competency and safety with a firearm in a dynamic shooting environment. This practical exam satisfies Host Club needs to demonstrate Due Diligence prior to allowing events within their club location.

Volunteerism and sportsmanship are central tenets of DSSBCA; participant Clubs pledge match organizers will never be paid, and prizes will never be distributed based upon placement. Any monies raised through DSSBCA activities must be returned to the Society for use by the Membership to further the community of sport shooting competitions. Prizes are awarded as participation “door prizes” so even the newest participants have a chance at winning.

As a Society DSSBCA has Annual General Membership meetings, and Members may have their say in the functioning of the Society, including reviewing financial statements and voting upon Directors to lead the Society.

C.T.https://www.dssmatch.com/ 


Multigun
Multi-Gun or Multi-Gun, often also called 2-Gun or 3-Gun depending on the types of firearms used, are practical shooting events where each of the stages requires the competitor to use a combination of handgunsrifles, and/or shotguns[1] Multigun has a lot in common with ordinary IPSCUSPSA single gun matches, and matches generally have courses of fire where the shooter must move through different stages and engage targets in a variety of different positions.

Multigun in its oldest form is arranged by the International Practical Shooting Confederation (IPSC) as Tournaments but doesn’t require the competitor to transition between firearms during the stage. Instead, tournaments consist of separate Component Matches for each firearm type with a combined scoring in the end.

Power factor and calibres

In regular matches, competitors can compete with any centerfire calibre they wish, as long as the power factor requirements are satisfied. Multigun in general has fewer division-specific power factor requirements than USPSA/IPSC single gun matches. This means that anyone can be competitive with readily available factory ammunition in affordable calibres, and in practice, almost all multi-gun competitors use handguns and Pistol Caliber Carbines (PCC) in 9×19 mm minor handguns, .223 Rem minor rifles, and 12 gauge major shotgun. This way competitors don’t have to worry about exotic calibres or handloading to achieve a perceived scoring advantage due to a power factor scoring handicap. All multigun associations also offer a separate Heavy division requiring larger calibres, like for instance a .45 ACP major handgun, .308 Win major rifle, and 12 gauge major shotgun. Some associations also have separate matches for .22 LR rimfire handguns and rifles.

Divisions

Divisions have become very specialized, but all rulesets offer roughly similar divisions with small variations under different names.

  • IPSC: Open, Modified, Standard, Production.
  • USPSA: Open, Tactical, Limited, Heavy Metal Tactical and Heavy Metal Limited.
  • 3GN: Unlimited, Practical, Practical 308, Factory and Heavy.
  • IMA: Open, Stealth, Tactical, Limited and Heavy Metal.
  • UML: Open, Limited, Tactical Optics, Heavy Optics. Also with the variations 2×4 Open, 2×4 Tactical, PCC Only, 2 Gun (Handgun and Rifle).
Open / Unlimited / Stealth

Open was the largest division in multigun for many years, but was quickly surpassed by Tac Ops from its introduction and is the smallest division today. All firearms may have compensators, ports and/or any number of optical sights. Any number of bipods and similar supporting devices may be used on the rifle and shotgun, and can be added or removed at any time.

Modified / Practical / Tactical Optics

This division has by far the largest match participation with around 70-80 % of the competitors. Handguns and shotguns can only be iron sighted, while the rifle can be fitted with one optic with variable magnification as well as any number of iron sights. Compensators are not permitted, except for on the rifle where it must be within maximum dimensions of 1×3 in (25.4×76.2 mm), and bipods are not permitted.

Factory / Limited / Standard

This division is restricted to iron sights on handguns and shotguns. Rifles are restricted to one non-magnified optical sight, such as a 1x prismholographic or red dot sight, and any number of iron sights. IPSC however limits Standard rifle to iron sights only. Compensators are not permitted, except for on the rifle where it must be within maximum dimensions of 1×3 in (25.4×76.2 mm), and bipods are not permitted.

Heavy / Practical 308

All multi-gun associations offer a separate Heavy division requiring larger major calibres. The handgun must often be a .45 ACP major calibre with a maximum ten rounds capacity, the rifle must often be a .308 Win major calibre with a power factor of a minimum 360 kgr·ft/s (7.11 Ns), and the shotgun usually is required to be a manual 12 gauge pump. Rules vary some on rifle sights, with one scope of any variable magnification sometimes being permitted, only one non-magnified optic sometimes being permitted, or sometimes iron sights only.

Shooting carts

A shooting cart also called a range cart or gun cart is a type of trolley used for transporting firearms and related equipment on the range. Since the sport requires a lot of equipment, which can amount to over 25 kg (55 lb) when accounting for items such as firearm and allied equipment, food, water, clothing and other personal gear, shooting carts are popular in multi-gun competitions for transporting equipment between stages. In addition to ready-made store-bought shooting carts, some use improvised shooting carts based on golf trolleys or baby strollers. Cross-country jogging strollers are particularly popular due to the bigger wheels making it easier to navigate on uneven gravel.

C.T. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multigun

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