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Shooting Disciplines What is Bullseye Shooting?

Shooting Disciplines What is Bullseye Shooting?

Shooting Disciplines What is Bullseye Shooting?

Competitors shoot targets as close to the middle as possible with slow precision fire. Beginners are often recommended bullseye shooting in order to learn the fundamentals of marksmanship

Bullseye shooting

A round shooting target with several hits in the centre, is called “bullseye”.

Bullseye shooting is a category of pistol and rifle shooting disciplines where the objective is to achieve as many points as possible by hitting around the shooting target as close to the middle as possible with slow precision fire. These disciplines place a large emphasis on precision and accuracy through sight picture, breath and trigger control. Fixed and relatively long time limits give the competitors time to concentrate for a perfect shot. An example of bullseye shooting is the ISSF pistol and rifle disciplines, but there are also many other national and international disciplines which can be classified as bullseye shooting. The shooting distances are typically given in round numbers, such as 10, 25, 50, 100, 200 or 300 meters depending on firearm type and discipline. Competitions are usually shot from permanent shooting ranges and with the same target arrangement and distance from match to match. Usually, the competitors each have their own shooting target and shoot beside each other simultaneously. Because of the relatively simple match format, beginners are often recommended bullseye shooting in order to learn the fundamentals of marksmanship. Bullseye shooting is part of the Summer Olympic Games, and a considerable amount of training is needed to become proficient.

Bullseye shooting with handguns

  • The six ISSF shooting events with pistols (four Olympic events plus two events not included in the Olympics program but are contested in World Cups and World Championships), its roots date back to the first modern Olympic Games in 1896, consist of both precision slow-fire and rapid-fire target shooting from distances of 10, 25, and 50 meters. The pistols are unique in appearance compared to normal guns and each event has its own pistols designed specifically for the job. Shooters must use one hand only to shoot at a small “bullseye” target downrange. In the UK (except for Northern Ireland), it is no longer possible to practice for some of the Olympic events following the Firearms (Amendment) (No. 2) Act 1997, legislation brought in after the Dunblane Massacre.
  • The CISM Rapid Fire match is similar to the ISSF 25m Rapid Fire Pistol event.
  • NRA Precision Pistol, also called conventional pistol shooting, is a bullseye shooting where up to 3 handguns of different calibres are used. Its history is almost as old as ISSF events. Shooters must fire the pistol one-handed at 6- and 8-inch bullseye targets placed 25 and 50 yards down range respectively.
  • Precision Pistol Competition (PPC), was originally a police shooting program started in 1960 by the National Rifle Association of America.[21]

Bullseye shooting with rifles[edit]

  • Four-position small bore is a popular sport in the U.S.[14]
  • The six rifle ISSF shooting events (including two Olympic events: 10-meter air rifle and 50-meter rifle three positions) consist of long-time target shooting from distances of 10 or 50 or 300 metres (33 or 164 or 984 ft).[14]
  • Gallery rifle shooting is popular in the UK and was introduced as a substitute for many pistols shooting disciplines following the 1997 handgun ban.
  • High Power Rifle (also known as “Across the Course” or ‘traditional’ High power) in the United States is a format that shoots 3-position (standing, kneeling or sitting, and prone) at 200, 300, and 600 yards. The term “Across the Course” is used because the match format requires the competitors to shoot at different distances to complete the course of fire.
  • Military Service Rifle shooting is a shooting discipline that involves the use of rifles that are used by military forces and law-enforcement agencies, both past and present use. Ex-military rifles, sniper rifles (both past and present) and civilian versions of current use service rifles are commonly used in the Military Service Rifle shooting competitions. It is popular in the United States and culminates each year with the National Matches being held at Camp Perry, Ohio. Some countries have outlawed civilian shooting at human-silhouette targets; silhouette targets are not used in the National Match Course of Fire. Bullseye targets are used. High Power Rifle competition often is held at the same events as Service Rifle, such as the U.S. national championships each year at Camp Perry. High Power competitors generally are civilians using whatever rifles they prefer within the rules, whereas Service Rifle entrants are limited to current or previous U.S. armed forces weapons. Although according to NRA rules only certain matches allow optical sights, normally those conducted at ranges over 600 yards.
  • Project Appleseed is a rifle marksmanship program by The Revolutionary War Veterans Association that teaches both rifle marksmanship and oral history regarding the American Revolutionary War. It shoots 3-position (standing, sitting, and prone) at 25 meters at reduced scale targets, simulating shooting at 100, 200, 300, and 400 yards. The techniques taught easily apply to transitioning to High Power Rifle.
  • Full bore and small-bore rifle shooting in the United Kingdom.
  • Three-position airgun competitions are popular in the United States.

C.T.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shooting_sports#Practical_shooting

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