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Free Black Powder Quiz

Free Black Powder Quiz

Free Black Powder Quiz

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Black Powder was already used in the middle ages.

Correct! Wrong!

People in the Middle Ages quickly learned to use black powder to launch balls or projectiles from a cannon. They did this by igniting the powder behind the ball or projectile in a cannon.

It is imperative to use only black powder recommended by the manufactures of the firearm.

Correct! Wrong!

Because of advancements in technology, some firearms are manufactured to handle either smokeless, black powder or black powder substitutes. It is emphasized that all individuals follow the manufacturer’s instructions regarding powder types and safe loads.

Black powder is not considered an explosive.

Correct! Wrong!

Muzzleloading firearms use black powder or black-powder substitutes. Black powder is classified as an explosive and is easily ignited by heat, friction, static electricity or a sharp blow and must be handled with extreme care. It is strongly recommended that individuals interested in muzzleloading seek additional training from qualified specialists in the field.

Old black powder firearms should be inspected by a gunsmith prior to use.

Correct! Wrong!

Today, most firearms for black powder use are reproductions of muzzleloaders. Older firearms may not be safe to fire and should be checked by a gunsmith before use.

A muzzleloader that is not primed to fire, is safer to handle.

Correct! Wrong!

If a muzzleloader is not primed to fire, it is safer to handle. To ensure that a muzzleloader is not primed to fire, do the following: 1. Point the muzzle in the safest available direction and keep finger off the trigger and out of the trigger guard. 2. Check that the hammer is not in full-cock position. 3. Check for a percussion cap or see if the priming pan is primed. 4. If the firearm is primed, remove cap or priming powder.

Never use smokeless powder in a muzzle loader.

Correct! Wrong!

Always use the powder recommended for your muzzleloader. Never use smokeless powder in a muzzleloader. Never use black powder in a modern cartridge firearm not designed for it. Always use a volumetric measure to put powder into the muzzle; never pour directly from the main powder container. Under safe-storage regulations, black-powder firearms are considered loaded when powder and/or ball are in the barrel.

Black Powder is not corrosive so you don't need to clean them.

Correct! Wrong!

A black-powder firearm must be properly cleaned after every firing session. Black powder is very corrosive. It attracts moisture, which causes rust. Refer to the owner's manual.

You do not need to handle a muzzleloader with the same respect due all firearms.

Correct! Wrong!

A "Hangfire" is more common in black powder firearms.

Correct! Wrong!

Do treat a misfire as a hangfire that could fire at any second. Wait at least 60 seconds with the firearm pointed in a safe direction.

Cartridge ammunition is available loaded with black powder.

Correct! Wrong!

Black powder is also used in some metallic cartridges for firearms specifically designed for their use. Care should be taken. Although they have the same name as a modern-smokeless cartridge, they may not be interchangeable. Never interchange smokeless powder and black powder. Use them only in firearms intended for their use.

Never interchange smokeless powder and black powder.

Correct! Wrong!

Black powder is difficult to ignite.

Correct! Wrong!

Black powder ignites very easily. A glowing coal, a spark, even static electricity or a sharp blow may ignite it. Handle black powder with great care, especially when transporting it. Black powder should be stored in a secure, cool dry place and always in its original container.

Black Powder can become unstable with age.

Correct! Wrong!

As black powder ages, it becomes more unstable. When stored for long periods, the granules will begin to cake together and white crystals will form. When this happens, the black powder has become very unstable. It should be soaked immediately in water.

FFFFg Powder is very versatile and can be used for all applications.

Correct! Wrong!

Never use FFFFg powder as anything other than a priming powder. Black powder ignites easily. Always handle with extreme care and wear eye protection. Never have a source of ignition around powder. Never smoke near black powder. Glowing embers may be present in the bore after firing a black powder firearm. An explosion hazard could be created if you proceed immediately to reload. Never interchange smokeless powder and black powder. Use them only in firearms intended for their use.

You can use any amount of black powder. Measuring is not important.

Correct! Wrong!

Always use a volumetric measure to put powder into the muzzle. Never pour directly from the main powder container. In compliance with firearms safe storage regulations, a muzzleloader with powder in the barrel is considered loaded.

Free Black Powder Actions Quiz
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Free Black Powder Actions Quiz – https://bcfirearmsacademy.ca/wp_quiz/free-black-powder-actions-quiz/

 

Free Black Powder Actions Quiz This Free fun quiz will help you prepare for history section of the Canadian Firearms Safety Course CFSC / CRFSC

Black powder projectiles Modern black powder or muzzleloading firearms shoot several different types of projectiles as follows:

  • Spherical – round ball, usually loaded along with a lubricated patch, which seals the barrel around the ball
  • Conical – cylindrical-shaped projectiles known as Mini-balls, they have a hollow base that expands to seal the gases when the firearm fires
  • Shot – pellets of assorted sizes and materials
  • Sabot – plastic or synthetic carrier that encases a projectile.

Overview:

  1. Muzzleloading handguns are still in use today. However, most modern muzzleloaders are reproductions of older designs
  2. This type of firearm is loaded through the muzzle. A measured amount of powder with a volumetric measure and poured it through the muzzle into the barrel, followed by a patch, and finally a lead ball or shot. A hole located at the rear of the barrel just above the trigger allows a flash or spark to enter the barrel through the priming port and ignite the powder, firing the charge.
  3. With flintlock muzzleloaders, the igniting spark is the result of the flint, held by the cock, hitting the frizzen. On percussion muzzleloaders, the flash is produced by the hammer striking a percussion cap.
  4. Muzzleloading firearms use black powder or black powder substitutes. Black powder is classified as an explosive and is easily ignited by friction, a hard blow or even static electricity. It must be handled with extreme care. It is strongly recommended that individuals interested in muzzleloading seek additional training from specialists in the field.

 

It is very important that exact loading and unloading procedures are followed when handling muzzleloaders. Before attempting it, get the assistance of a qualified individual and carefully follow the instructions in your owner’s manual. Ensure that firing mechanism (lock) is rendered safe before proceeding to load the firearm. Before loading the firearm, use a rod with a tight fitting patch to clean the bore, and fire a cap to remove oil from the bore and flash port.

 

Never use smokeless powder in a muzzleloader. Never use black powder in a modern cartridge firearm not designed for it. Always use a volumetric measure to put powder into the muzzle. Never pour directly from the main powder container. In compliance with firearms safe storage regulations, a muzzleloader with powder in the barrel is considered loaded.

 | BC Firearms Academy

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https://bcfirearmsacademy.ca

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